Let Particle Physics have fun

I don’t know why but this video clip attracts me strangely. Even if I don’t understand all the advanced notions that are evocated quickly one after the other, (I am not really up-to-date despite all my efforts to understand some of it), I bow in front of the enormous work to adapt Queen’s music (Bohemian… Read More

Space and tennis collide in Roland Garros

30 years ago, on May 28, 1983, in the middle of a tennis match between John McEnroe and Drew Gitlin, the public suddenly started to applaud with no apparent reason. The first US space shuttle, Enterprise, was flying over the Roland Garros stadium during an in-flight demonstration for the Bourget air show. Even McEnroe did… Read More

Free electron

The other day, I was talking with Frank about exceptional software programmers able to influence notably a whole company by their own activity or impossibly better than the rest of the programming crowd. This person is the one you need to hire when you have an exceptional entrepreneurial project or the one you want to… Read More

Kermit, it’s the end

You know that you’re a computer dinosaur when you discover that a computer program you started with is reaching its end-of-life after… 30 years. The Kermit Project is canceled, effective 1 July 2011. I think that I actually started using Kermit on a Vax 11/780 computer from Digital Equipment Corporation to exchange data between various… Read More

3 Berkeley Lab radiation experts about Fukushima

This is an exceptionally precise and understandable presentation of the knowledge amassed about the Fukushima dramatic events since 11th March 2011. On April 17, 2011, Robert Budnitz, Ed Morse and Tom McKone discussed Japan’s nuclear crisis. I recommend their comments (including the web sites they list in the end of the presentation). YouTube link Listed… Read More

USSR science in pictures

I discovered (thanks to BoingBoing) a superb Russian blog which shows copies of scientific documents dating back to the era of communist Russia. scienceillustration.mypage.ru : A little bit of nostalgia for “communist science” (and sometimes for the Western science seen by USSR) with beautiful pictures and illustrations.

Reliability of lead-free soldering

For those of you who asked for more details about the reliability of lead-free soldering (see the end of my previous titled “Manufacturing of electronic boards“, I have found an interesting and useful analysis from Numonyx (now Micron Semiconductors). Lead-free and leaded package soldering compatibility – Backward and forward compatibility This white paper explores the… Read More

The mimic octopus

This is an extremely weird octopus which -like many other octopuses- is able to change its skin color. It does it much better than usual, but its real prowess is its ability to change its body form to simulate or mimic the appearance of other aquatic animals. Absolutely astonishing. YouTube link

Fruits and vegetables in hospital

Normally, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is interesting only the physicists for its uses in scientific research and the physicians for the fabulous pictures it gives of the insides of the human body. An MRI scanner will allow to display fine cuts of the body of the patient laid into the machine, but what is to… Read More

Let the US government teach you a language

In the spotlight: Sony Alpha 900 Canon EOS 5D Mk II Nikon D700 FX Download Nero for free These are language courses which have been developed by the US government and are set in the public domain. So, you can use them as much as you want. A long list of languages: Amharic Arabic Bulgarian… Read More